1997 Grammy Winners

40th Annual GRAMMY Awards (1997)

The GRAMMYs threw itself a pretty wild 40th birthday party at New York’s Radio City Music Hall — a night of great highs and even some interesting lows. This was the evening that a resurgent Bob Dylan gave arguably his greatest televised performance ever with a focused and mysterious version of “Love Sick” from the Album Of The Year-winning Time Out Of Mind — only to find himself joined by an unwelcome stage crasher with the curious words “Soy Bomb” scrawled on his torso. The latter was not alone in rushing the stage — rapper Ol’ Dirty Bastard of Wu-Tang Clan fame decided to take the stage during Shawn Colvin’s acceptance speech for Song Of The Year (“Sunny Came Home”) to declare, among other things, “Wu-Tang are for the children.” Somehow it all added up to an entertaining night of surprises — pleasant or otherwise.

Hosting in a tuxedo with tails, “Frasier” star Kelsey Grammer formally addressed the matter right up front: “The GRAMMYs turn 40 tonight and who better to guide her into middle age than a mature, sober individual such as myself. And given the fact that four out of five of you will not get GRAMMYs tonight, it didn’t seem like a bad idea to have a psychiatrist on hand.” Right he turned out to be.

It was a particularly big night for Will Smith, who opened the evening Big Willie Style performing both “Men In Black” and “Gettin’ Jiggy Wit It.” Even more moving was his acceptance speech for Best Rap Solo Performance. “This is actually the first time that I’ve ever been on a GRAMMY stage,” Smith said, explaining that as part of D.J. Jazzy Jeff And The Fresh Prince, he had won the first GRAMMY ever given to a rap artist at the 31st show. “But the GRAMMYs, they weren’t televising the rap portion, you know, so we boycotted,” he said. Three years later, the pair won another GRAMMY, but didn’t think they had a chance, so they didn’t attend. He then spoke movingly about feeling disconnected from the music during “the rap dark ages” a few years earlier, but that artists like Tupac Shakur and the Notorious B.I.G. had inspired him to make music again. After threatening to give the speeches from the shows he missed, Smith then dedicated this GRAMMY victory to the late rappers’ memories, and said their deaths had reminded him and other artists that they “have a responsibility…for what goes into the impressionable ears of the people listening to the music we make.”

Other performance highlights included everything from a crowd-pleasing medley of Rumours hits from Fleetwood Mac — the album had been named Album Of The Year exactly 20 years earlier — to Wyclef Jean and Erykah Badu powerfully merging his “Gone Till November” and her “On & On” (which won Best Female R&B Vocal Performance). R. Kelly soared performing “I Believe I Can Fly” before winning in the Best Male R&B Vocal Performance category and thanking everyone from Michael Jordan to Bugs Bunny for his big Space Jam hit.

After all the commotion and fun, Bob Dylan — a three-time winner on the night — had a way of bringing it all back to the music. When Sheryl Crow, Usher and John Fogerty presented him with the night’s final award for Album Of The Year, Dylan reflected back in time. “One time when I was about 16 or 17 years old, I went to see Buddy Holly play at a Duluth National Guard Armory and I was three feet away from him and he looked at me,” Dylan recalled. “And I just have some kind of feeling that he was — I don’t know how or why — but I know he was with us all the time when we were making this record in some kind of way. In the words of the immortal Robert Johnson, ‘The stuff we got will bust your brains out.’” And on this historic night, Dylan did just that.

Finally, the 40th Annual GRAMMYs also featured what is considered to be the greatest last-second substitution act in GRAMMY history. When GRAMMY Legend Award recipient Luciano Pavarotti’s throat problems caused him to cancel his performance of “Nessun Dorma” from Puccini’s opera Turandot just a few hours before showtime, the GRAMMY production team was able to get Aretha Franklin — who had sung the same piece at the MusiCares Person of the Year fundraiser two nights earlier — to step in “literally at a moment’s notice,” as Sting said in his introduction. Fortunately, the Queen of Soul showed a new side of her extraordinary talent to a watching world, and helped save this GRAMMY performance.

Record Of The Year
 
winner
Sunny Came Home

John Leventhal, producer

Album Of The Year
 
winner
Bob Dylan
Time Out Of Mind

Daniel Lanois, producer

Song Of The Year
 
winner
Sunny Came Home

Shawn Colvin & John Leventhal, songwriters (Shawn Colvin)

Best New Artist
 
winner
Paula Cole
Best Female Pop Vocal Performance
 
winner
Sarah McLachlan
Building A Mystery
Best Male Pop Vocal Performance
 
winner
Elton John
Candle In The Wind 1997
Best Pop Performance By A Duo Or Group With Vocal
 
winner
Virtual Insanity
Best Pop Collaboration With Vocals
 
Best Pop Instrumental Performance
 
Best Dance Recording
 
winner

Giorgio Moroder, producer

Best Traditional Pop Vocal Performance
 
winner
Tony Bennett
Tony Bennett On Holiday
Best Female Rock Vocal Performance
 
Best Male Rock Vocal Performance
 
winner
Bob Dylan
Cold Irons Bound
Best Rock Performance By A Duo Or Group With Vocal
 
winner
One Headlight
Best Hard Rock Performance
 
winner
The End Is The Beginning Is The End
Best Metal Performance
 
winner
Aenema
Best Rock Instrumental Performance
 
winner
Block Rockin' Beats
Best Rock Song
 
winner
One Headlight

Jakob Dylan, songwriter (The Wallflowers)

Best Rock Album
 
winner
Blue Moon Swamp
Best Alternative Music Performance
 
winner
Radiohead
Ok Computer
Best Female R&B Vocal Performance
 
Best Male R&B Vocal Performance
 
winner
R. Kelly
I Believe I Can Fly
Best R&B Performance By A Duo Or Group With Vocal
 
Best Rhythm & Blues Song
 
winner
R. Kelly
I Believe I Can Fly

R. Kelly, songwriter (R. Kelly)

Best Rap Solo Performance
 
winner
Men In Black
Best Rap Performance By A Duo Or Group
 
winner
I'll Be Missing You
Best Rap Album
 
winner
No Way Out

Puff Daddy & The Family

Best Female Country Vocal Performance
 
Best Male Country Vocal Performance
 
winner
Vince Gill
Pretty Little Adriana
Best Country Performance By A Duo Or Group With Vocal
 
winner
Alison Krauss & Union Station
Looking In The Eyes Of Love
Best Country Collaboration With Vocals
 
Best Country Instrumental Performance
 
Best Country Song
 
winner
Butterfly Kisses

Bob Carlisle & Randy Thomas, songwriters (Bob Carlisle, Jeff Carson & Raybon Bros.)

Best Country Album
 
Best Contemporary Jazz Performance
 
winner
Into The Sun
Best Jazz Vocal Performance
 
Best Jazz Instrumental Solo
 
Best Jazz Instrumental Performance, Individual Or Group
 
winner
Pat Metheny
Beyond The Missouri Sky
Best Large Jazz Ensemble Performance
 
winner
Joe Henderson Big Band

Joe Henderson Big Band

Best Rock Gospel Album
 
winner
Welcome To The Freak Show - dc Talk Live In Concert
Best Pop/Contemporary Gospel Album
 
Best Southern, Country Or Bluegrass Gospel Album
 
winner
Amazing Grace 2 - A Country Salute To Gospel

(Various Artists)

Best Traditional Soul Gospel Album
 
winner
I Couldn't Hear Nobody Pray
Best Contemporary Soul Gospel Album
 
winner
Brothers
Best Gospel Choir Or Chorus Album
 
winner
Kirk Franklin
God's Property From Kirk Franklin's Nu Nation

Myron Butler, Kirk Franklin & Robert Searight II, choir directors (God's Property)

Best Latin Pop Performance
 
Best Latin Rock/Alternative Performance
 
Best Tropical Latin Performance
 
winner
Buena Vista Social Club
Best Mexican-American/Tejano Music Performance
 
winner
En Tus Manos
Best Traditional Blues Album
 
winner
Don't Look Back
Best Contemporary Blues Album
 
winner
Señor Blues
Best Traditional Folk Album
 
winner
L'amour Ou La Folie
Best Contemporary Folk Album
 
winner
Bob Dylan
Time Out Of Mind
Best Reggae Album
 
winner
Ziggy Marley
Fallen Is Babylon

Ziggy Marley & The Melody Makers

Best World Music Album
 
Best Polka Album
 
winner
Jimmy Sturr
Living On Polka Time
Best Musical Album For Children
 
winner
All Aboard!

John Denver

Best Spoken Word Album For Children
 
winner
Winnie-The-Pooh
Best Spoken Word Album
 
winner
Charles Kuralt's Spring
Best Spoken Comedy Album
 
winner
Roll With The New

Chris Rock

Chris Rock, artist.

Best Musical Show Album
 
winner
Chicago - The Musical

Jay David Saks, producer (Various Artists Featuring Ann Reinking, Bebe Neuwirth, James Naughton & Joel Grey)

Best Instrumental Composition
 
winner
Aung San Suu Kyi

Wayne Shorter, composer (Herbie Hancock & Wayne Shorter)

Best Instrumental Composition Written For A Motion Picture Or For Television
 
winner
The English Patient

Gabriel Yared, composer (Gabriel Yared)

Best Song Written Specifically For A Motion Picture Or For Television
 
winner
R. Kelly
I Believe I Can Fly (From Space Jam)

R. Kelly, songwriter (R. Kelly)

Best Instrumental Arrangement
 
winner
Straight, No Chaser

Bill Holman, arranger (The Bill Holman Band)

Best Instrumental Arrangement Accompanying Vocal(s)
 
winner
Cotton Tail

Slide Hampton, arranger (Dee Dee Bridgewater)

Best Recording Package
 
winner
Titanic - Music As Heard On The Fateful Voyage

Hugh Brown, Al Quattrocchi & Jeff Smith, art directors (Various Artists)

Best Boxed Recording Package
 
winner
Beg Scream And Shout! - The Big Ol' Box Of '60s Soul

Hugh Brown, David Gorman & Rachel Gutek, art directors (Various Artists)

Best Album Notes
 
winner
Anthology Of American Folk Music - 1997 Expanded Edition
Best Historical Album
 
winner
Anthology Of American Folk Music - 1997 Expanded Edition

Amy Horowitz, Jeff Place & Pete Reiniger, compilation producers; David Glasser & Charlie Pilzer, mastering engineers (Various Artists)

Best Engineered Album - Non-Classical
 
winner
Hourglass

Frank Filipetti, engineer (James Taylor)

Producer Of The Year, Non-Classical
 
winner
Babyface
Remixer Of The Year, Non-Classical
 
Best Engineered Album, Classical
 
winner
Copland: The Music Of America (Fanfare For The Common Man; Rodeo)

Michael Bishop & Jack Renner, engineers (Erich Kunzel, conductor)

Producer Of The Year, Classical
 
winner
Steven Epstein
Best Classical Album
 
winner
Yo-Yo Ma
Premieres - Cello Concertos (Works Of Danielpour, Kirchner, Rouse)

Yo-Yo Ma & David Zinman, artists; Steven Epstein, producer

Best Orchestral Performance
 
winner
Pierre Boulez
Berlioz: Symphonie Fantastique; Tristia

Pierre Boulez, conductor (Cleveland Orchestra)

Best Opera Recording
 
winner
Georg Solti
Wagner: Die Meistersinger Von Nurnberg
Best Choral Performance
 
winner
Adams: Harmonium/Rachmaninoff: The Bells

Robert Shaw, conductor (Atlanta Symphony Chorus; Atlanta Symphony Orchestra)

Best Instrumental Soloist(s) Performance (With Orchestra)
 
winner
Yo-Yo Ma
Premieres - Cello Concertos (Works Of Danielpour, Kirchner, Rouse)

Yo-Yo Ma, artist (Philadelphia Orchestra)

Best Instrumental Soloist Performance (Without Orchestra)
 
winner
Bach: Suites For Solo Cello Nos. 1-6

Janos Starker, artist

Best Chamber Music Performance
 
winner
Beethoven: The String Quartets

Emerson String Quartet (Eugene Drucker, Lawrence Dutton, David Finckel & Philip Setzer), artists

Best Small Ensemble Performance (With Or Without Conductor)
 
winner
Hindemith: Kammermusik No. 1 With Finale 1921, Op. 24 No. 1
Best Classical Vocal Performance
 
winner
An Italian Songbook - Works Of Bellini, Donizetti, Rossini
Best Classical Contemporary Composition
 
winner
Adams: El Dorado

John Adams, composer

Best Short Form Music Video
 
winner
Got 'Till It's Gone

Mark Romanek, video director; Aris McGarry, video producer

Best Long Form Music Video
 
winner
Alanis Morissette, GRAMMY winner
Jagged Little Pill - Live

Alanis Morissette & Steve Purcell, video directors; Glen Ballard, David May, Alanis Morissette & Steve Purcell, video producers